RHINOCORT VERSUS NASONEX:  

WHICH NASAL SPRAY IS BETTER? 

 

WHAT ARE RHINOCORT AND NASONEX? 

Rhinocort and Nasonex are nasal sprays categorized as intranasal corticosteroids. Both can be purchased over the counter at a pharmacy. The generic name for these nasal sprays is budesonide (Rhinocort) and mometasone (Nasonex). Corticosteroids are commonly referred to as “steroids”. They work by decreasing inflammation.  These products are in spray form so that they can be applied directly to the affected area instead of taking oral tablets by mouth. 

WHAT ARE THEY USED TO TREAT? 

Intranasal corticosteroids can be used for chronic rhinosinusitis or seasonal allergies. These products help alleviate runny nose, itchy nose, and watery eyes. Chronic rhinosinusitis is defined as inflammation of the nasal passages with nasal congestion or blockage for longer than 12 weeks. In other words, the nostrils are swollen which causes stuffiness or blockage of the nostrils.  

HOW TO USE IT 

  1. Shake the bottle well. 
  2. Look down by bending your neck and looking toward the floor.  
  3. Put the nozzle just inside your nose. 
  4. Aim toward the outer wall and squirt once or twice as directed; do not aim toward the nasal septum (in the middle of the nose) to prevent irritation and bleeding.  
  5. Change hands and repeat for the other side.  
  6. Do not sniff hard.

WHICH NASAL SPRAY WORKS BETTER? 

There have been no studies comparing Rhinocort to Nasonex therefore it is hard to determine which is better. They are equally effective at treating symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis such as facial pain/pressure, congestion, nasal drainage, headache, decreased smell, and postnasal drip. Side effects of these nasal sprays include nose bleeds, pain/scratchy throat, cough, irritation to the nostrils, and nasal itching. These common side effects are more prevalent with Nasonex versus Rhinocort, however, these side effects have low prevalence. If used for long periods of time, these medications can affect your eyes so speak with your doctor about the need for regular eye exams. The cost for these nasal sprays is about $15 each.  

A study is being performed now in Canada that compares the use of mometasone nasal spray versus budesonide nasal irrigation in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.The study started in 2017 and is estimated to end in October 2021. [Clinical trial: NCT03323866] 

REFERENCES  

  1. Scolaro, Kelly L. Colds and Allergy. In: Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care. 20th Edition. American Pharmacists Association; 2020: chapter 11. Accessed September 14, 2021. https://doi-org.bunchproxy.idm.oclc.org/10.21019/9781582123172.ch11 
  1. Rosenfeld, Richard M., Piccirillo, Jay F, Chandrasekhar, Sujana S, et al. Clinical Practice Guideline (Update): Adult Sinusitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015; 152(2):S1-S39. https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599815572097    
  1. Hamilos, DL, Holbrook, EH. Chronic Rhinosinusitis: Management. UpToDate. UpToDate, Inc.; 2021. Updated September 13, 2021. Accessed September 14, 2021. Chronic rhinosinusitis: Management – UpToDate (oclc.org) 

 

Article by Spencer Overstreet, Pharmacy Student from Belmont University 

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